All children reading at grade level through singing


A 501(c)3 nonprofit organization

The Rock 'n' Read Project


AFFIRMING PARALLEL CONCEPTS (APC)
A researched and evidence-based strategy


APC uses folk songs and singing games to consciously practice skills that the brain needs to retain and recall automatically.

  • Singing and playing singing games boosts vitality, builds memory, and raises reading and math achievement.
  • Singing and playing singing games create a positive classroom climate and promote social-emotional learning.

  • Folk songs are building blocks for the brain. Folk songs are simple patterns that the brain remembers, even for generations!


COMPONENTS

Daily singing: classroom teachers have students sing many times during every day. 

Pitch: teachers start a song using a pitch pipe app so that the melody stays within the comfortable range of students’ voices. 

Leading songs: classroom teachers become confident in leading songs and having students keep a steady beat. 

Learning by ear: teachers transmit songs as they have traditionally been handed down—by ear.

APC Lessons: using chants, folk songs, and singing games, teachers create their own lessons to practice reading skills with their students, and share the APC lessons and videos of students in class, and provide peer coaching. 


APC Examples

Who Stole the Cookie from the Cookie Jar? Video
Using each others' names, students keep the beat with a pat-clap pattern. Then, the teacher adapts it to, "Who stole the ___ (a number) from the cookie jar?" Each student chooses among their cards with numbers 1-10 and holds the called number up. Use with letter names, letter sounds, sight words, fractions, etc.


Circle Round the Zero Video
One student walks around the outside of a circle of children (the zero), finds a partner, and together they do the motions of the game; then the first student takes the place of the chosen one, and the game begins again. Extend the game to practice circling around the ___ (a different number, letter, or letter sound. Could also practice math facts by having everyone hold a number card and then multiply the circling student’s card with the chosen student’s card; everyone sings the answer.


Skip to my Lou
Sing the story song over and over while choosing new partners. Another day, the class reads together the illustrated folk song book, "Skip to my Lou," so that students match the visual symbols for words with the story they have already memorized.  Another day, students create their own new rhyming verses.


This Land is Your Land (or any other folk song)

After the song is memorized, students read it together on a screen. Another day, they sing the same song again while reading the words at a faster tempo. Then, the teacher covers up a few words.  As students sing-read the song, they are silent on the covered up words (can also just tell them aurally which words to omit).